Modeling & Simulating Storm Surge in Cedar Key

I first visited Cedar Key in 2005, during early research on Rosewood. A lot has changed since then. Some of this is the normal ebb and flow of a coastal town, some of it from increasing tourism, and some from the growing threat of sea level rise and storm surge. Much of my earlier research uses digital technologies to interpret archaeological materials. These same technologies support different forms of analysis. This post explores (very) preliminary work on the formal modeling and simulation of geophysical processes associated with storm surge, and specifically how this threatens Cedar Key’s archaeological and historical resources.

[Updated November 9, 2019 to include DualSPHysics work – see below]


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Disaster Anthropology & HSOHP

Disaster Anthropology is a rapidly growing aspect of anthropology’s applied/engaged focus. This approach directs our attention to the ways risk and vulnerability are disproportionately experienced by cultures and societies during disaster events. It also offers ethnographically-based solutions to reconnecting local victims with non-local agencies before, during, and following such events (e.g., hurricanes, firestorms, earthquakes, reactor meltdowns). This post includes a web map and links to oral histories collected as part of my 2013 Disaster Anthropology course offered at Monmouth University, in preparation for me offering this course at the University of Central Florida in fall 2018. (more…)

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