IQ-GIS and Historical Archaeology

This post relates some thoughts on the combination of GIS and game engines for historical archaeology. This approach examines virtual world environments as a type of 3D GIS allowing users to move through space while simultaneously interacting with various data. This immersive, qualitative GIS (IQ-GIS) supports the display and interpretation of both qualitative and quantitative data. While a complete prototype is still some months away, here’s a sneak peak! This post also forces me to cogently express my thoughts for a few upcoming grant proposals.

3D Reconstruction of Fort Charles, Nevis
3D Reconstruction of Fort Charles, Nevis

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Using Virtual Archaeology to Teach Historical Archaeology

The use of digital technologies for visualizing past environments is experiencing something of a renaissance. This is due to dropping costs of hardware and an increase in the intuitive usability of 3D/virtual environments. The ability to deliver interactive content via the internet (a.k.a. Web 2.0) provides new ways of sharing research wider audiences. These developments also provide exciting pedagogical potentials. This post discusses how my teaching of historical archaeology benefits from these emerging technologies. Specifically, the use of a virtual world environment to explore historical architecture as described in James Deetz’s In Small Things Forgotten: An Archaeology of Early American Life.

The New England Saltbox House
The New England Saltbox House

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New Heritage and Dark Tourism (Publication)

I recently published an article that I’m very, VERY proud of. It is the culmination of year’s of thinking about the role that new media can play in public outreach at sites stained by death and/or an association with death. These places are increasingly view through the rubric of dark tourism. The article is titled “New Heritage and Dark Tourism:A Mixed Methods Approach to Social Justice in Rosewood, Florida” and you can download it here. You can read the abstract below. (more…)

New Heritage and Dark Tourism (SAA 2013)

I don’t often make it to the annual Society for American Archaeology (SAA) meetings, mainly because I’m an historical archaeologist and I regularly attend the SHA meetings which are typically held a couple of months earlier. I made an exception this year after being invited to participate in a session on engaged and public approaches to archaeology. You can read the title and abstract below. Update: this and other presentations formed the basis for my article “New Heritage and Dark Tourism: A Mixed Methods Approach to Social Justice in Rosewood, Florida.” (more…)

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