Fort Charles Archaeology Project Year 1

The Fort Charles Archaeological Project (FCAP) is a multi-year project exploring one of the earliest British forts in the Caribbean. The site is home to an early 17th century fort built shortly after the settlement of Nevis in 1628. Our work seeks to understand the changing nature of Caribbean society for more than two and a half centuries. In many ways, forts acted as points of contact between islands and the broader world. This is especially true at multipurpose sites like Fort Charles, which served as a customs fort for at least part of its occupation. You can learn more about this exciting project at the FCAP Website.

Main gate at Fort Charles (2013).

(more…)

Continue Reading

New Heritage and Dark Tourism (Publication)

I recently published an article that I’m very, VERY proud of. It is the culmination of year’s of thinking about the role that new media can play in public outreach at sites stained by death and/or an association with death. These places are increasingly view through the rubric of dark tourism. The article is titled “New Heritage and Dark Tourism:A Mixed Methods Approach to Social Justice in Rosewood, Florida” and you can download it here. You can read the abstract below. (more…)

Continue Reading

New Heritage and Dark Tourism (SAA 2013)

I don’t often make it to the annual Society for American Archaeology (SAA) meetings, mainly because I’m an historical archaeologist and I regularly attend the SHA meetings which are typically held a couple of months earlier. I made an exception this year after being invited to participate in a session on engaged and public approaches to archaeology. You can read the title and abstract below. Update: this and other presentations formed the basis for my article “New Heritage and Dark Tourism: A Mixed Methods Approach to Social Justice in Rosewood, Florida.” (more…)

Continue Reading

Intersectional Violence and Documentary Archaeology (SHA 2013)

This was a particularly busy year for me at the annual Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) meetings, held in beautiful Leicester, England! My participation included once again presenting as part of the Tech Room, this time on arranging a sponsored session titled “Modern Technology, Past Culture: Emerging Effects of Information Technologies on Archaeological Practice,” which I organized with Quentin Lewis of UMass Amherst. I also presented a solo-authored paper titled “Intersectional Violence and Documentary Archaeology in Rosewood, Florida,” as part of a session I organized on the “Archaeology of Intersectionality.” You can read titles and abstracts for both sessions below. Update: portions of this paper and others presentations eventually formed a core portion of the theorizing in my book “The Rosewood Massacre: An Archaeology and History of Intersectional Violence.” (more…)

Continue Reading

Digital Storytelling in the Classroom (AAA 2012)

My participation at this year’s annual American Anthropological Association (AAA) meetings centered on delivering on paper and serving as a discussant. The paper, which I presented as first author with UF’s Clarence Gravlee, was titled “Digital Storytelling in the Classroom: New Media Techniques for an Engaged Anthropological Pedagogy.” I also served as the discussant for a session titled “Borders and Crossings by Land, Sea, and Air: Geospatial Advances in Anthropological Research.” You read the abstract for the paper below. Update: several of the ideas presented in this year’s paper were (eventually!) published as part of the chapter titled “Digital Storytelling in the Classroom: New Media Technologies for an Engaged Anthropological Pedagogy.” (more…)

Continue Reading

GIS Workshop at AAA 2012 Meetings

The 2012 annual American Anthropological Association (AAA) meetings are once again in San Francisco, California (November 12-18). This year’s conference includes a workshop on GIS and cultural anthropology, co-organized by Andrew Tarter (website) and myself. The workshop is kindly sponsored by the Culture and Agriculture section of the AAA (website).The workshop has approximately 25 pre-registrations, one of the largest enrollments of any workshop at this year’s meetings. Participants received a 90+ page workbook introducing them to basic and intermediate geospatial techniques commonly used by anthropologists. The following post presents a brief introduction to the workshop. (more…)

Continue Reading

Visualizing NJ Property Value

This post concerns the visualization of property values. I am working on this for an upcoming project on the African American experience in Asbury Park, New Jersey, and particularly the 1970 riot. Part of this research focuses on the socioeconomic experiences (e.g., access to property ownership, property values) of various groups ithroughout the 20th century. Property ownership remains part of the “American Dream” and lured African Americans to many northern locations, places promising a more equitable society. A promised often denied. (more…)

Continue Reading

Dark Tourism, Social Justice Education, and Virtual Archaeology (SHA 2012)

My participation at this year’s Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) annual meetings centered presenting on “Archaeological Visualization and Public Engagement” as part of the tech room and delivering a paper titled “Dark Tourism, Social Justice Education, and Virtual Archaeology.” You can read the abstract below. As always, if you’re interested in reading the paper or viewing the PowerPoint, please contact me. Update: portions of this paper were included in my article titled “New Heritage and Dark Tourism: A Mixed Methods Approach to Social Justice in Rosewood, Florida.” (more…)

Continue Reading
Close Menu